Baby Boomers Nearing Retirement Drive New Markets in Affordable, Assisted Living

As the percentage of retired Baby Boomers is expected to explode over the next decade, the demand for assisted living and long-term care facilities will naturally have a parallel effect.

Today, the senior housing industry is considered one of the fastest growing real estate investment opportunities in the national housing market.

Even self-help coach Tony Robbins is getting in on the action, by listing senior housing as the second safest place to invest in a recent blog post on his website.

In 2003, Warren Buffett proved to be way ahead of the curve, when he purchased Clayton Homes — now the largest builder of mobile homes — for an estimated $1.7 billion.

The senior housing industry has an estimated market value of more than $300 billion annually. And the PEW Research Center has shown that the average return on investment for the senior housing industry, significantly outperforms all others within the real estate sector.

In the past, senior housing has been a very resilient part of the housing demand, with occupancy rates trending around 90 percent. Even during the recent “Great Recession” occupancy rates in the senior housing industry remained consistently above 85 percent.

On average, assisted living homes costs between $3,000 to $5,000 per month, per tenant, and can accommodate from 8 to 16  residents per unit, depending on state regulations.

But even with their generally higher education and income levels, many of these future residents will be unable to afford the luxury of paying for quality assisted care.

The average Baby Boomer household, ages 56-to 61-years-old, has about $164,000 saved for retirement, according to a report by the Economic Policy Institute. That amounts to around $8,200 a year, or only $680 a month, to supplement Social Security or other retirement income.

However, the median Baby Boomer retirement savings for the same age group is only $17,000, which is far less than the average household. So in reality, the future for many Baby Boomers approaching retirement is much more grim.

In the same report, an estimated 41 percent of households (ages 55-to 64-years-old) have no retirement savings set aside, whatsoever.

Although the Boomers approaching retirement are generally too young to need assisted-living, (the average resident age being 84) they are already having an impact on that market.

“Assisted living facilities have a projected 30 percent growth rate over the next 10 years, and are selling 18 percent faster today due to a lack of inventory,” said Daniel Summers, CEO of RealtyeVest, a real estate investment company that specializes in raising capital for assisted living and affordable housing.

Invest in Mobile Homes

While the above average income Baby Boomer will continue to push the assisted living capacity demands through 2030,  the remaining will be searching for an alternative to assisted living by downsizing to affordable homes.

“Developers are recognizing the growing demand for affordable housing, and have begun aggressively acquiring and upgrading communities across the United States,” Summers said.

“And many retirees are trading in their homes for RVs and moving into 55-plus mobile home communities.”

“If you’re a Baby Boomer on a fixed or limited income you can rent or sell your larger site-built home and purchase an RV or mobile home and move to the retirement location of your choice,” Summers said.

 

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Investor Spotlight: Doctor, Author Kenyon Meadows Reveals His Secrets for Investing in Real Estate

investor spotlight dr. kenyon meadows

Dr. Kenyon Meadows

Dr. Kenyon Meadows is a radiation oncologist from Youngstown, Ohio. He completed his residency in 2006 at the University of Florida and has been practicing medicine at the Southeast Georgia Cancer Care Center since 2008.

In addition to saving lives, Dr. Meadows is a published author and successful real estate investor, with an interest in residential properties in Jacksonville, Fla. Since 2013, he’s invested in approximately 35 deals on RealtyeVest, formally IHT Realty Crowdfunding, and similar crowdfunding platforms.

We recently sat down with Dr. Meadows to discuss his new book, “Alternative Financial Medicine: High Yield Investing in a Low Yield World” and his thoughts on real estate investing and the crowdfunding industry as a whole.

Q – How did you get started in real estate investing?

Dr. Meadows: I got “prepared” after enduring some stock market pain. Like everyone, I got hit pretty hard with the financial crash of 2008. But, after rebalancing into what I thought was a stable sector — oil and gas — I took another big decline. Soon after, I began to try to learn in earnest about alternative assets, such as real estate. Those efforts paid off after I met an investor who provided private money to a rehabber that was flipping about 15 houses per year in the Jacksonville market. After learning about the attractive yields and relatively passive nature of private mortgage lending, I took the plunge.

Q – Why do you primarily invest in the single-family market?

Dr. Meadows: While there are certainly advantages of scale when it comes to investing in commercial real estate properties, such as multifamily, there are a few factors that make single-family homes a more attractive investment. For instance, single-family homes attract small, working class families, who tend to rent for long stretches and hence minimizes what is often the largest expense associated with income property ownership: vacancy.

Also, in contrast to apartment tenants, they tend to feel more of a sense of “ownership” toward the property and therefore take better care of it on average. Both of these factors help to contribute to more stability, which translates into a more passive ownership experience for me. And should I ever chose to exit my portfolio, I like the option of having both an investor and retail buyer pool to potentially sell to.

Q – What initially peaked your interest in crowdfunding?

Dr. Meadows: Right around the time following my first few successful projects, some of the crowdfunding sites were coming online. This was really appealing to me because it allowed me to invest small amounts of money into real estate projects, which was more of what I was already doing. and I only invest in first-position debt.  Also, the opportunity to invest in properties across the country that otherwise would be out of reach was an intriguing concept. However, I probably would have been more afraid had I not had the prior experience with private lending.


Q – What are the best practices for a crowdfunding company?

Dr. Meadows: I love repeat sponsors with a track record of paying investors back. I am willing to sacrifice a little lower return for the chance to participate in their deals, but I only invest in first-position debt. I also like platforms that prefund the deals they list, which serves to align their incentives with the investors. Additionally, prompt communication in the event that there are any hiccups along the way is greatly appreciated. Out of the 35 or so crowdfunding deals I have done, only three are in some stage of the foreclosure process. Some sites have been better than others with respect to updates, but they all seem to be optimistic that there will be full principal recovery. That’s another reason why I only invest in first-position debt.

Q – What red flags about an investment offer have you encountered?

Dr. Meadows: If I see a deal with outsized returns my caution flag goes up. For instance, in the earlier stages of real estate crowdfunding, you could routinely see debt deals in the 14-15% range. As the space has matured and more investors are comfortable with the asset class, returns have compressed to the 9-11% range.

Q –  Tell me about your most successful real estate crowdfunding deal.

Dr. Meadows: It was a unique hybrid fix and flip deal in Los Angeles that had both first position debt, as well as a percentage of the profits from the sale. The loan was at 11% and the profit percentage was capped at an additional 8%. So, 19% when it was all said and done! That was back in 2015 and I haven’t come across anything that attractive since.

Q – Do you have any advice for sponsors/developers on how to stand out in the crowdfunding industry?

Dr. Meadows: Most crowdfunding sites lead with the deal terms and numbers – I would like to see more emphasis on the sponsors track record featured more prominently.

Q- Lastly, why did you choose to write this book? 

Dr. Meadows: I got tired of explaining all of the benefits of alternative assets on a one-on-one basis to people, and I figured I could reach more people with a book. In my opinion, real estate is the best, but there are certainly other investment opportunities that are appealing as well.

 

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How to Use a Self Directed IRA to Invest in Real Estate

What is Crowdfunding?

Crowdfunding is a marketplace with a transactional platform.

For instance, imagine sitting at a table in a Golden Corral restaurant and the buffet is filled with platters of colorful food of virtually every type. Well, crowdfunding is much like a buffet for investors. Instead of ordering off the menu, the buyer or “investor” goes to where the “food” is and selects what he wants.

Unlike the traditional way of investing – when the sponsor (real estate developer or entrepreneur) sought out the investor for funding – investors can now log into a network and view a vast selection of real estate sponsors seeking funding. This allows investors to select from deals that catch their interests and fit in with their investment portfolios.

The Benefits of Investing in Real Estate Crowdfunding 

Investing in crowdfunding for real estate is a safer and smarter approach for those looking to diversify their portfolios and grow wealth. This is because the real estate market has less volatility than the stock market and offers higher rates of return than government bonds and savings accounts. Combine that with the tax advantages, and it becomes an essential part of any smart investment strategy.

Since the JOBS Act of 2012, real estate sponsors have been able to successfully crowdfund their projects by raising capital in small amounts through a broad number of individuals that provide access to a wider pool of potential investors. Likewise – with the buffet example – investors have the opportunity to mitigate the risk and invest in several deals in lieu of a single opportunity.

Due to advancements in technology, self-directed IRA investors are able to participate in real estate crowdfunding with their retirement accounts and at the same time realize significant tax advantages.

Those who want to be more in control of their financial future and enjoy more flexibility in the investment types, use self-directed IRAs.” – Dan Summers, CEO at RealtyeVest

Investing with a Self Directed IRA

Investing with a self-directed IRA is not overly complicated.

To make an investment using an IRA, you’ll need a self-directed IRA custodian who can hold the new property as an asset in your account. Once you’ve found a custodian, you open a new account and transfer your retirement funds into it. There are no tax penalties involved in the transferring of funds to the account.

A self-directed IRA can be structured as either Roth IRA or traditional IRA and allows the owner to invest in alternative assets such as real estate crowdfunding. As an investor, you can have a much more diversified portfolio than those invested exclusively in publicly traded securities.

Self-directed IRAs are also protected under federal bankruptcy laws, plus, real estate investments are insurable, which means they cannot disappear into thin air like some traditional Wall Street investments.

The real-estate crowdfunding platform is predicted to reach $150 billion over the next five years.

How to Invest

Although a self-directed IRA involves more of a hands-on approach, if you do your due-diligence and partner with a reputable crowdfunding company, the rewards can significantly outweigh the risks.

Investing with a self-directed IRA with RealtyeVest is as easy as four steps.

  1. Register to view investment offerings.
  2. Choose investments that suit your preferences.
  3. Invest with as little as $5,000 per deal.
  4. Receive scheduled payments.

 

 

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